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From a reader...

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    Stephen Drew, author of Into the Thin , has obviously fallen in love with Millicent McTeer as much as I have. His Amazon review of her tale is humbling and gratifying to her author. To read any book is an experience in relationship with the story and characters, with the author’s voice. Often, it’s a matter of simply reading, absorbing, turning pages, then reflecting on what’s been offered. Sometimes, though, there’s more. There are characters framed in such a way that I fall in love with them, storytelling that compels me to turn pages, a narrative voice that pulls me onto those pages, and that allows reading them to become the high point of the day. I then come to a place where I begin reading more slowly as the book becomes thin in the right hand, and I realize this has to end soon. Such was my relationship with this book. Whatever could be left but to reread? Henry Mitchell’s tale brings me to some of my favorite places, through portals, folds of time (and no time

For love or money...

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Sunshine is more fun to walk in than rain. Love lasts longer than money. This author writes for love. My books do sell occasionally, and to keep myself honest as a writer, I give away my author's royalties. Royalties from The Winged Child are going to the Pop-up Pantry of Saluda . henrymitchellbooks.com

Come with us...

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I have mixed feelings about hawking my books, even my favorite and latest, The Winged Child . Pumping it up on social media feels to me somehow demeaning and depressing, reeks of desperation. That's my problem, perhaps. I simply can't feel warm and fuzzy toward an algorithm. On the other hand, I love to talk about my novel, read from it, answer questions for people who have a genuine interest, who share a space and a connection, and I will happily travel some miles for a reading and discussion at a reader's group or an independent bookstore. A blog is somewhat more intentional than Facebook or Twitter. I'm assuming you are reading this because something I wrote resonates, and I'm grateful for your notice. If we can't meet in a realworld location somewhere soon, I'll be reading for you from The Winged Child on this blog over the coming weeks. Give me your questions, and I'll answer them, too. Welcome to this journey with Millicent McTeer and her author.

Live launch- The Winged Child...

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  Thanks to Creative James Media for the live virtual launch of The Winged Child today. Watch it here . henrymitchellbooks.com

Live Book Launch Feb 21...

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  Virtual Book Launch, live on Twitter and Facebook 5:00 pm eastern time, hosted by Creative James Media. henrymitchellbooks.com

The Winged Child - a review...

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Another review of my favorite literary Child (the winged one). This assessment comes from writer and visual artist, Sharon Clabo , who works not far south from here, in Lizella, Georgia. Genre-defying Cutting Edge Thought  Henry Mitchell's newest novel, The Winged Child, defies classification, choosing instead to marry cutting-edge science with an intriguing and fantastical sort of "otherness," a potent and nutritious stew of important ideas presented in the form of an original and intriguing novel.  In the book, Present, Past, and Future are shown as separable only in our minds, when in fact they exist all of a piece; in other words, the present, past, and future are "one," a refrain that is often repeated in the book by a songbird.  To this reader, the book's many layers can be seen as interrelated learning experiences, lessons necessary before any sentient being can even begin to arrive at its ultimate destiny, or what some might choose to cal

Wayseeker speaks...

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  What follows is not merely David Longley's review of The Winged Child that makes me feel good about my book. It is a beautiful piece of writing that makes me feel good about life. Precariously poised on our tip-toes, leaning out over the endless void, arms outstretched, hearts aflutter with anticipation, side by side atop the picnic table... We were what? 2 or 3 years old? Towel-capes diaper-pinned around our tiny necks. We knew we could fly. We just...knew it. We were so much lighter then: physically, ontologically, emotionally. Life...the whole world...was enchanted. Anything was possible. We lose that, don't we? 9 to 5's, mortgages, the weight of adulthood: it all piles on to smother the whimsy, curiosity and lightness of being. In Through the Ages by Cloud Cult, Craig Minowa sings: I'm done being stupid and worried and dramatic So I lay down my every disguise So if ever I can't see the magic around me, please take my hands off my eyes What Mitchell acc